What you need to know about hypertension

What You Need to Know About Hypertension

By: Meg Irish

According to the American Heart Association, more than 100 million Americans have hypertension, also known as high blood pressure. Hypertension puts you at greater risk for various cardiovascular diseases including heart disease, stroke, and sometimes death. High blood pressure occurs when the force of blood flowing through your blood vessels is consistently high. This contributes to hardening of the arteries because the heart is continuously working harder to pump blood around the body. What you need to know about hypertension

According to TPMG Osteopathic Family Medicine Physician, Matthew D. Fenlason, DO, “Hypertension is the most common condition treated by primary care physicians and is responsible for the greatest number of chronic prescriptions.”

Blood Pressure Guidelines (American Heart Association)

  • Normal Blood Pressure: under 120/<80 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury)
  • Elevated Blood Pressure: 120-129/<80 mm Hg
  • Stage 1 Hypertension: 130-139/80-89
  • Stage 2 Hypertension: <140/90
  • Hypertensive Urgency: >180/>120
  • Hypertensive Emergency: >180/>120 with organ failure (kidney, heart, etc.)

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McKenzie Method

Taking Treatment Into Your Own Hands – The McKenzie Method

By: Madison Bambini

If you’re suffering from an achy neck or back, leg or arm pain, numbness or tingling, you’re not alone. Have you been diagnosed with sciatica, sacroiliac joint pain, arthritis, or degenerative disc disease? Would you like to know how to alleviate your pain? There are several treatment options available, but a globally recognized approach known as the McKenzie Method not only treats your pain but helps you prevent future flare-ups. Read more

Quick! Somebody Call a … Nurse Practitioner?

By: Meg Irish & Ashley Gesiewski

With all the different technical titles that exist within the field of medicine, it can be confusing for patients when choosing a physician. In particular, there tends to be a misunderstanding around the title of Nurse Practitioner (NP).

What is a nurse practitioner?

A nurse practitioner is an advance practice Registered Nurse. This means they were once a registered nurse and went back to school to broaden their scope of practice. Nurse practitioners can diagnose and treat illnesses and prescribe medications. According to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), NPs work “autonomously and in collaboration with healthcare professionals and other individuals, to provide a full range of primary, acute and specialty health care services.” These clinicians are becoming an integral part of healthcare facilities as their experience working as a nurse gives them a unique approach to patient care. Read more

TPMG Adds Physicians in Williamsburg and Newport News

Local medical group, Tidewater Physicians Multispecialty Group (TPMG), a network of over 220 physicians and advanced practice clinicians in over 75 offices across the Tidewater area, is adding a variety of physicians to Williamsburg and Newport News.

The Orthopedics division is expanding with the addition of Shane McGowan, MD, and Nicholas A. Smerlis, MD, FAAOS, CAQSH, practicing in both Williamsburg and Newport News. Certified hand therapist, Kerry Bate, OT, CHT, joins both Physical Therapy locations in Williamsburg and Newport News. Joining well-established gastroenterologist, Richard J. Hartle, MD at Digestive Disease Center of Virginia is board certified gastroenterologist, Frances J. Jones, MD, FACG. Also joining in Williamsburg, osteopathic family medicine physician, Matthew D. Fenlason, DO, who will practice at Williamsburg Family Medicine. Read more

Mammogram

Placing a High Priority on Mammogram Screenings for Women

Second only to skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer found in women in the United States. One in eight women are diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime.

According to the American Cancer Society in 2019, an estimated 268,600 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women along with 62,930 new cases of non-invasive breast cancer. Most cases of breast cancer in women are found at 50 years of age or older; however, around 11 percent of new cases are found in women younger than 45 years of age.

There is currently no way to prevent breast cancer. The best option is to catch breast cancer early through screenings and exams. Furthermore, the earlier a patient is diagnosed, the more options they have available to them for minimally invasive treatment. Read more